Online study – Online College Offers http://onlinecollegeoffers.net/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 05:40:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-15.png Online study – Online College Offers http://onlinecollegeoffers.net/ 32 32 Attractive women get better grades – unless school is online: study https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/attractive-women-get-better-grades-unless-school-is-online-study/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 12:01:16 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/attractive-women-get-better-grades-unless-school-is-online-study/ The privilege is real, according to a new study of university students – or at least it was, until COVID-19[feminine] leveled the playing field. A recent article published in peer-reviewed journal Economics Letters found that both men and women in some college courses got better grades the more physically attractive they were – but when […]]]>

The privilege is real, according to a new study of university students – or at least it was, until COVID-19[feminine] leveled the playing field.

A recent article published in peer-reviewed journal Economics Letters found that both men and women in some college courses got better grades the more physically attractive they were – but when learning moved online during the pandemic, the report found women were losing their edge while men kept it.

Study author Adrian Mehic, a fifth-year doctoral student at Sweden’s Lund University, said his paper was the first to analyze the impact of virtual learning on the “beauty premium”. , or the advantage of being physically attractive.

That said, there has been plenty of other research on the benefits of attractiveness. For example, pretty people are often more confident, satisfied with their life and apparently Less likely to engage in criminal activitiesaccording to recent studies.

“We know those who are super attractive compared to those who are very unattractive, there could be a salary gap of 10 to 12% between them,” Mehic told The Star, citing recent research. “…Now, with our study, we know that this discrimination also exists in the higher education system.”

Mehic’s project followed 307 industrial engineering students during their first and second years at Lund University, tracking their academic performance before and after switching to online learning during COVID-19. To rank the attractiveness of each student, Mehic assembled a jury of 74 people to rate the students on a scale of one to ten.

As expected, Mehic found that attractiveness was positively correlated with better grades in non-quantitative courses like business or humanities, which rely more on student-teacher interaction. The effect was not present in quantitative courses like math and physics.

This correlation disappeared with the shift to distance learning, but only for female students. The attractive male students retained their beauty bonus, a “big surprise” for Mehic.

“These results suggest that the return to facial beauty is likely due primarily to discrimination for females and the result of a productive trait for males,” Mehic hypothesized in the paper.

For example, he believed attractiveness in men could lead to increased confidence and perseverance, which would translate into greater overall productivity. On the other hand, the beauty bonus for women may stem from discrimination by instructors, Mehic said.

“In this study, most of the teachers or professors are men. Which would make sense for them to discriminate in favor of attractive women in most cases,” Mehic continued.

Mehic also noted that “the effect was clearly stronger in classes taught by men… But there is evidence that female teachers either discriminated against or gave attractive women higher grades as well,” a- he declared.

Women can still benefit from increased productivity through attractiveness, Mehic added, although he thinks it’s less pronounced because “I think women are generally less confident… and we know from tons of other studies that women generally have lower self-esteem than men.” .”

For example, a 2016 study of 48 countries and 985,937 people found men have consistently reported having higher self-esteem than womenand that the gap was significantly larger in Western countries.

For Lauren Bialystok, associate professor of ethics and education at the University of Toronto, Mehic’s findings are supported by a “very well-established body of literature” that found humans have a bias toward beauty.

However, given the relatively small sample size of Sweden-based Mehic, Bialystok recommended that the subject bestudied and replicated further before we can say that there are decisive differences between online learning and in-person learning on this particular phenomenon,” she said. “But I think it all sounds very plausible.”

Bialystok also warned that the factors contributing to the beauty premium for both genders could be more multifaceted than depicted. There’s probably more than one explanation for the phenomenon — for example, “women who aren’t perceived as beautiful might get lower ratings than they deserve everywhere,” she said.

Meanwhile, Mehic argued that her findings could be generalized to a wider population, as similar results have been seen in other beauty studies. Mehic considers that his research has “opened a door for many other scientists who wish to carry out similar studies”.

He also confirmed that when courses were online, women who were perceived as less attractive overall saw a slight increase in their grades.

Speaking of solutions, Mehic said anonymizing exam and assignment grading could help eliminate bias.

Meanwhile, Bialystok noted that it’s part of human nature to judge people based on their looks. There’s not much we can do to prevent this from happening other than being aware it exists and doing our best to be fair, she said.

“It’s one of our implicit biases that I think most people don’t recognize, so I want to be very careful not to assign moral blame or insinuate that anyone has ever given a woman an advantage because ‘he thought she was beautiful was sexist,” she said. “I don’t think it works that way.”

“…In a sexist world where the main currency of women has always been their physical attractiveness and their ability to play a feminine role in accordance with heterosexual male expectations, women perceived as beautiful and compatible with the feminine role have obtained advantages and privileges which other women don’t have,” Bialystok said.

“It’s not fair, but it’s also hard to blame women when that’s how the system is set up.”

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Are your children being sexually abused online? A study reveals that a “substantial part” is https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/are-your-children-being-sexually-abused-online-a-study-reveals-that-a-substantial-part-is/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 16:03:45 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/are-your-children-being-sexually-abused-online-a-study-reveals-that-a-substantial-part-is/ A new study published by the JAMA Network on Friday, October 14, found that a “substantial portion of young people” had experienced child sexual abuse online. The study, conducted in late 2021, questioned 2,639 children aged 18 to 21 about their childhood experiences of online abuse. Of these, 933, or about 35%, said they had […]]]>

A new study published by the JAMA Network on Friday, October 14, found that a “substantial portion of young people” had experienced child sexual abuse online.

The study, conducted in late 2021, questioned 2,639 children aged 18 to 21 about their childhood experiences of online abuse. Of these, 933, or about 35%, said they had experienced at least one instance of “technology-facilitated abuse” before the age of 18, the authors wrote. Overall, the survey found that 15.6% of participants experienced online sexual abuse as children.

Study: “A significant proportion of young people” have suffered online sexual abuse

  • More than 15% of 18 to 21 year olds experienced online sexual abuse before they turned 18, according to a study.
  • Types of abuse ranged from taking and sharing non-consensual images to self-generated images shared with adults.
  • Foreigners did not constitute the majority of authors; dating partners, friends and acquaintances, including other teenagers, have done so.
  • Parents should have honest discussions with children about how to know if people are trustworthy online and how to identify signs of online sexual abuse, one study author advised.

The different types of abuse covered in the survey and the frequency with which they were experienced include:

  • More than 5% have experienced online grooming by adults. Grooming refers to “a set of manipulative behaviors that the abuser uses to gain access to a potential victim, coerce them into accepting the abuse, and reduce the risk of being caught,” TODAY previously reported.
  • About 11% have experienced image-based sexual abuse, such as taking or sharing a photo without the child’s consent.
  • About 7% have experienced self-generated child sexual abuse images, such as young people creating their own image and sharing it with someone who has shared it without their permission or intentionally shared it with adults. It does not include peer-to-peer image sharing.
  • About 7% experienced non-consensual sexting, which included both non-consensual taking and sharing of pictures.
  • About 3% have experienced revenge pornography, when images were taken or shared to intentionally humiliate the child.
  • About 3.5% experienced sextortion, when someone threatened to post sexual images in order to obtain money or sexual activity from the victim.
  • Almost 2% have been victims of online commercial sexual exploitation, meaning that the child has provided sexual services for payment, including words, images or other online activity.

The authors also noted that in most cases the perpetrators were not online strangers, but rather people the respondents already knew, such as dating partners, friends or acquaintances.

“Sexual abuse migrates online, and most of the studies that have been done on sexual abuse so far have not included the full range of experiences of sexual abuse,” said lead author David Finkelhor, Ph.D., director of Crimes Against Children Research. Center at the University of New Hampshire, said TODAY. “The predominant image people have of the media is that it’s alien predators stalking children online, and that’s not the whole story. It’s a lot more complicated.”

Finkelhor noted that study authors often tended to be people who knew children offline and began to communicate with them inappropriately. But that doesn’t just apply to adults in children’s lives, he said.

“About a third of the perpetrators are other young people. There is a considerable amount of sexual abuse because children take images or receive images and then use them without consent,” Finkelhor said.

According to the study, girls were more vulnerable than boys, and the most vulnerable age group was between 13 and 17, although teenagers were often the perpetrators as well.

Finkelhor also said the rise of technology has facilitated more cases of sexual abuse than before, especially with the prevalence of cameras.

“Social life and interpersonal interactions of all kinds now have a technological component, so it’s not at all surprising that it’s playing an increasingly important role,” he said. “There may be some facilitation that many people mistakenly thought they could do things online or get away with things online that they couldn’t do in a face-to-face environment. .”

These findings have monumental implications for teens and parents, Finkelhor said. The study notes that education efforts for young people need to become more comprehensive and that there may be benefit in integrating online safety tools into existing educational programs.

“There’s a whole variety of things going on, and we have to recognize the bigger picture,” Finkelhor said. “What we need to understand is that children need a lot more information and training to judge who is trustworthy, what the signs are, if someone asks something inappropriate, how to ‘get out of it and refuse the offers and manipulations they may receive, especially from people they know.

For parents, Finkelhor strongly recommends having an open conversation with children about the risks of online communication and what to do in certain situations.

“It’s very important that parents have conversations with their children about romantic and sexual relationships and their values ​​around it, and offer specific help by suggesting the kinds of things they should be careful of,” he said. declared. “So having candid conversations about things that are happening in the world of romance and sex.”

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Are your children being sexually abused online? A study reveals that a “substantial part” is https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/are-your-children-being-sexually-abused-online-a-study-reveals-that-a-substantial-part-is-2/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 16:03:45 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/are-your-children-being-sexually-abused-online-a-study-reveals-that-a-substantial-part-is-2/ A new study published by the JAMA Network on Friday, October 14, found that a “substantial portion of young people” had experienced child sexual abuse online. The study, conducted in late 2021, questioned 2,639 children aged 18 to 21 about their childhood experiences of online abuse. Of these, 933, or about 35%, said they had […]]]>

A new study published by the JAMA Network on Friday, October 14, found that a “substantial portion of young people” had experienced child sexual abuse online.

The study, conducted in late 2021, questioned 2,639 children aged 18 to 21 about their childhood experiences of online abuse. Of these, 933, or about 35%, said they had experienced at least one instance of “technology-facilitated abuse” before the age of 18, the authors wrote. Overall, the survey found that 15.6% of participants experienced online sexual abuse as children.

Study: “A significant proportion of young people” have suffered online sexual abuse

  • More than 15% of 18 to 21 year olds experienced online sexual abuse before they turned 18, according to a study.
  • Types of abuse ranged from taking and sharing non-consensual images to self-generated images shared with adults.
  • Foreigners did not constitute the majority of authors; dating partners, friends and acquaintances, including other teenagers, have done so.
  • Parents should have honest discussions with children about how to know if people are trustworthy online and how to identify signs of online sexual abuse, one study author advised.

The different types of abuse covered in the survey and the frequency with which they were experienced include:

  • More than 5% online experience grooming by adults. Grooming refers to “a set of manipulative behaviors that the abuser uses to gain access to a potential victim, coerce them into accepting the abuse, and reduce the risk of being caught,” TODAY previously reported.
  • About 11% have experienced image-based sexual abuse, such as taking or sharing a photo without the child’s consent.
  • About 7% have experienced self-generated child sexual abuse images, such as young people creating their own image and sharing it with someone who has shared it without their permission or intentionally shared it with adults. It does not include peer-to-peer image sharing.
  • About 7% experienced non-consensual sexting, which included both non-consensual taking and sharing of pictures.
  • About 3% experienced revenge pornwhen images have been taken or shared to intentionally humiliate the child.
  • About 3.5% experienced sextortion, when someone threatened to post sexual images in order to obtain money or sexual activity from the victim.
  • Almost 2% have been victims of online commercial sexual exploitation, meaning that the child has provided sexual services for payment, including words, images or other online activity.

The authors also noted that in most cases the perpetrators were not online strangers, but rather people the respondents already knew, such as dating partners, friends or acquaintances.

“Sexual abuse migrates online, and most of the studies that have been done on sexual abuse so far have not included the full range of experiences of sexual abuse,” said lead author David Finkelhor, Ph.D., director of Crimes Against Children Research. Center at the University of New Hampshire, said TODAY. “The predominant image people have of the media is that it’s alien predators stalking children online, and that’s not the whole story. It’s a lot more complicated.”

Finkelhor noted that study authors often tended to be people who knew children offline and began to communicate with them inappropriately. But that doesn’t just apply to adults in children’s lives, he said.

“About a third of the perpetrators are other young people. There is a considerable amount of sexual abuse because children take images or receive images and then use them without consent,” Finkelhor said.

According to the study, girls were more vulnerable than boys, and the most vulnerable age group was between 13 and 17, although teenagers were often the perpetrators as well.

Finkelhor also said the rise of technology has facilitated more cases of sexual abuse than before, especially with the prevalence of cameras.

“Social life and interpersonal interactions of all kinds now have a technological component, so it’s not at all surprising that it’s playing an increasingly important role,” he said. “There may be some facilitation that many people mistakenly thought they could do things online or get away with things online that they couldn’t do in a face-to-face environment. .”

These findings have monumental implications for teens and parents, Finkelhor said. The study notes that education efforts for young people need to become more comprehensive and that there may be benefit in integrating online safety tools into existing educational programs.

“There’s a whole variety of things going on, and we have to recognize the bigger picture,” Finkelhor said. “What we need to understand is that children need a lot more information and training to judge who is trustworthy, what the signs are, if someone asks something inappropriate, how to ‘get out of it and refuse the offers and manipulations they may receive, especially from people they know.

For parents, Finkelhor strongly recommends having an open conversation with children about the risks of online communication and what to do in certain situations.

“It’s very important that parents have conversations with their children about romantic and sexual relationships and their values ​​around it, and offer specific help by suggesting the kinds of things they should be careful about,” he said. declared. “So having candid conversations about things that are happening in the world of romance and sex.”

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Are your children being sexually abused online? A study reveals that a “substantial part” is https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/are-your-children-being-sexually-abused-online-a-study-reveals-that-a-substantial-part-is-3/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/are-your-children-being-sexually-abused-online-a-study-reveals-that-a-substantial-part-is-3/ A new study published by the JAMA Network on Friday, October 14, found that a “substantial portion of young people” had experienced child sexual abuse online. The study, conducted in late 2021, questioned 2,639 children aged 18 to 21 about their childhood experiences of online abuse. Of these, 933, or about 35%, said they had […]]]>

A new study published by the JAMA Network on Friday, October 14, found that a “substantial portion of young people” had experienced child sexual abuse online.

The study, conducted in late 2021, questioned 2,639 children aged 18 to 21 about their childhood experiences of online abuse. Of these, 933, or about 35%, said they had experienced at least one instance of “technology-facilitated abuse” before the age of 18, the authors wrote. Overall, the survey found that 15.6% of participants experienced online sexual abuse as children.

The different types of abuse covered in the survey and the frequency with which they were experienced include:

  • More than 5% online experience grooming by adults. Grooming refers to “a set of manipulative behaviors that the abuser uses to gain access to a potential victim, coerce them into accepting the abuse, and reduce the risk of being caught,” TODAY previously reported.

  • About 11% have experienced image-based sexual abuse, such as taking or sharing a photo without the child’s consent.

  • About 7% have experienced self-generated child sexual abuse images, such as young people creating their own image and sharing it with someone who has shared it without their permission or intentionally shared it with adults. It does not include peer-to-peer image sharing.

  • About 7% experienced non-consensual sexting, which included both non-consensual taking and sharing of pictures.

  • About 3% experienced revenge pornwhen images have been taken or shared to intentionally humiliate the child.

  • About 3.5% experienced sextortion, when someone threatened to post sexual images in order to obtain money or sexual activity from the victim.

  • Almost 2% have been victims of online commercial sexual exploitation, meaning that the child has provided sexual services for payment, including words, images or other online activity.

The authors also noted that in most cases the perpetrators were not online strangers, but rather people the respondents already knew, such as dating partners, friends or acquaintances.

“Sexual abuse migrates online, and most of the studies that have been done on sexual abuse so far have not included the full range of experiences of sexual abuse,” said lead author David Finkelhor, Ph.D., director of Crimes Against Children Research. Center at the University of New Hampshire, said TODAY. “The predominant image people have of the media is that it’s alien predators stalking children online, and that’s not the whole story. It’s a lot more complicated.”

Finkelhor noted that study authors often tended to be people who knew children offline and began to communicate with them inappropriately. But that doesn’t just apply to adults in children’s lives, he said.

“About a third of the perpetrators are other young people. There is a considerable amount of sexual abuse because children take images or receive images and then use them without consent,” Finkelhor said.

According to the study, girls were more vulnerable than boys, and the most vulnerable age group was between 13 and 17, although teenagers were often the perpetrators as well.

Finkelhor also said the rise of technology has facilitated more cases of sexual abuse than before, especially with the prevalence of cameras.

“Social life and interpersonal interactions of all kinds now have a technological component, so it’s not at all surprising that it’s playing an increasingly important role,” he said. “There may be some facilitation that many people mistakenly thought they could do things online or get away with things online that they couldn’t do in a face-to-face environment. .”

These findings have monumental implications for teens and parents, Finkelhor said. The study notes that education efforts for young people need to become more comprehensive and that there may be benefit in integrating online safety tools into existing educational programs.

“There’s a whole variety of things going on, and we have to recognize the bigger picture,” Finkelhor said. “What we need to understand is that children need a lot more information and training to judge who is trustworthy, what the signs are, if someone asks something inappropriate, how to ‘get out of it and refuse the offers and manipulations they may receive, especially from people they know.

For parents, Finkelhor strongly recommends having an open conversation with children about the risks of online communication and what to do in certain situations.

“It’s very important that parents have conversations with their children about romantic and sexual relationships and their values ​​around it, and offer specific help by suggesting the kinds of things they should be careful of,” he said. declared. “So having candid conversations about things that are happening in the world of romance and sex.”

This article was originally published on TODAY.com

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3 students struck by lightning while studying online on top of a hill https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/3-students-struck-by-lightning-while-studying-online-on-top-of-a-hill/ Thu, 06 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/3-students-struck-by-lightning-while-studying-online-on-top-of-a-hill/ Phulbani: Three teenage students were struck by lightning as they were huddled together on a hill near their village in Kandhamal district for an online group study, police said. On Wednesday afternoon, the students had gathered at the top of the hill to study given the poor internet connectivity in the village of Mundagam, 185 […]]]>

Phulbani: Three teenage students were struck by lightning as they were huddled together on a hill near their village in Kandhamal district for an online group study, police said.

On Wednesday afternoon, the students had gathered at the top of the hill to study given the poor internet connectivity in the village of Mundagam, 185 km from the state capital, Bhubaneswar.

When the students failed to return home in the evening, their parents searched for them and found the three lying unconscious on the top of a hill, police said.

They were rushed to nearby Brahmanpada Public Health Center.

Subdivision Police Officer G Udayagiri Tirupati Rao Patnaik said the condition of one student was critical while two others were stable.

Patnaik added that all three were transferred to the district headquarters hospital in Phulbani.

The students have been identified as Dhiren Digal (17), Pinku Mallick (17) and Panchanan Behera (18).

Kandhamal District Chief Medical Officer Dr Monoj Upadhay said their condition was now stable.

Students usually go to the top of the hill where they can easily access mobile internet, said a villager.

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Misfortunes of online studies: to finance the online studies of children, many families of MPs go into debt https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/misfortunes-of-online-studies-to-finance-the-online-studies-of-children-many-families-of-mps-go-into-debt/ Sun, 02 Oct 2022 07:43:12 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/misfortunes-of-online-studies-to-finance-the-online-studies-of-children-many-families-of-mps-go-into-debt/ Bhopal, October 2: Kumer Singh, a resident of Amarpura village in Sehore district of Madhya Pradesh got into debt as he had to buy a mobile phone by taking a loan for his daughter’s online education during the Corona outbreak . The closure of educational institutions due to the epidemic and then online education has […]]]>

Bhopal, October 2: Kumer Singh, a resident of Amarpura village in Sehore district of Madhya Pradesh got into debt as he had to buy a mobile phone by taking a loan for his daughter’s online education during the Corona outbreak .

The closure of educational institutions due to the epidemic and then online education has created trouble for many poor families in Madhya Pradesh as these poor families have had to buy Android mobiles for their children’s education , for which they took out a loan. And now they have to pay a huge price in the form of interest.

Kumer Singh isn’t the only person who bought an Android phone by taking out a loan for his daughter’s education. The number of such people is much more.

Kumer Singh says his daughter Muskan studies in class VIII. “Due to the Corona epidemic, schools were closed first, then the focus shifted to online studies. Online studies were only possible when you had an Android phone. I had a phone with a keyboard, but for my daughter’s education we decided to buy an Android phone,” he says.

The mobile phone cost Rs 7,000 but he did not have that much lump sum so he took out a loan from someone in the village and in return paid the amount plus interest in installments. Several thousand rupees had to be paid as interest.

Kumer Singh says he first bought the phone with difficulty and after that the big problem was to charge the phone. Many times it was only possible to recharge one to two weeks after the recharge date.

Similar is the story of Lilabai Ivne from Kakaria village, her husband Bhagwant works as a labourer. She wants to educate her daughters, that’s why she bought an android mobile for her class VI daughter’s online education, for this she had to take a loan because she didn’t have enough money to buy one suddenly mobile.

She therefore had to become a debtor for her daughter’s online education. Several times, she also had to face charging problems, but she did not give up so that her daughter’s education did not stop.

Abid Khan, a resident of Singar Chori village in the same area, also had to fund a mobile phone for his children’s education.

A teacher in the capital Bhopal, speaking on condition of anonymity, said online education was a big problem for poor families because, first, they didn’t have cellphones and families that did had more. of a child who was studying. Not only that, many families also faced the cell phone charging problem, in such a situation, teachers used to charge children’s cell phones.

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Montreal online study recruiting patients with long COVID – Montreal https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/montreal-online-study-recruiting-patients-with-long-covid-montreal/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 23:39:59 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/montreal-online-study-recruiting-patients-with-long-covid-montreal/ A new study in Montreal hopes to better understand the lingering consequences of COVID-19 infections and the impact of the post-COVID syndrome known as long COVID on people’s lives. “We know that people have a whole range of symptoms and no one really understands why, it’s a whole new problem, so we need to solve […]]]>

A new study in Montreal hopes to better understand the lingering consequences of COVID-19 infections and the impact of the post-COVID syndrome known as long COVID on people’s lives.

“We know that people have a whole range of symptoms and no one really understands why, it’s a whole new problem, so we need to solve it scientifically,” said Dr Lesley Fellows, professor of neurology at McGill University. and one of the researchers conducting the study. “We’re basically trying to make it easier for patients to partner with us to help us understand their experience in a way that we can use for research.”

The Quebec Action for Post-COVID (QAPC) study is being conducted entirely online by the Montreal Neurological Institute-Hospital.

The goal is to identify persistent symptoms people have after COVID-19 infection but also to help people better cope with them.

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Read more:

1 in 8 adults end up with long COVID, new Dutch study finds

Isabelle Arseneau-Bruneau, 35, is one of the participants. In the past two and a half years, she says she has caught the virus four times.

She says her infections were more like the flu, but it’s really what happened after that continues to affect her the most.

“I still have pericarditis, I have tachycardia,” Arseneau-Bruneau said. “Of course, being out of breath is a problem.”

Arseneau-Bruneau says she suffers from brain fog, exhaustion and has also developed asthma as well as digestive issues.

“Clearly, everything is more difficult,” said the doctoral student.

Read more:

What causes the long COVID? Canadian researchers think they’ve found a key clue

People like Arsenea-Bruneau, aged 18 and over who had health problems for more than four weeks after catching the infection, can sign up to participate.

Another condition is that the person’s symptoms cannot be explained by any other diagnosis.


Click to play video: 'Woman with long-COVID says 'COVID won't let us go'







Woman with long-term COVID says ‘COVID won’t let us go’


Woman with long-term COVID says ‘COVID won’t let us go’ – June 30, 2022

Participants will be required to answer questions and take cognitive tests online every three months for 18 months.

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“They also have the ability to download a few simple apps that can help us monitor their symptoms day-to-day, week-to-week. They can also give us a more detailed picture of what is going on.

Researchers will track how people are feeling and how their symptoms progress.

Read more:

Nearly 6% of children suffer from long COVID but symptoms may be less severe: study

They will also provide personalized access to online tools and strategies to help relieve symptoms.

The researchers’ goal is not only to understand the long-term impact of the infection, but also to improve people’s quality of life.

“I think it will be helpful,” Arseneau-Bruneau said. “The more information we can get about this virus and its impact, the better. I think when we are struggling, if we can find a way to benefit from it, it helps psychologically at least.

The study is funded by Les Fonds de recherche du Québec – Santé and Scotiabank.

Anyone wishing to learn more or participate can do so via the post-covid.quebec study website or by email: post-covid.mni@mcgill.ca.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Climate change is making people angrier online: study https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/climate-change-is-making-people-angrier-online-study/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 12:20:00 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/climate-change-is-making-people-angrier-online-study/ Hate speech spikes on social media when temperatures rise above 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit), according to researchers at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. The study published in The Lancet Planetary Health earlier this month also suggests that heat is associated with psychiatric hospitalizations, increased suicide rates and more domestic violence, Bloomberg […]]]>

Hate speech spikes on social media when temperatures rise above 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit), according to researchers at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research.

The study published in The Lancet Planetary Health earlier this month also suggests that heat is associated with psychiatric hospitalizations, increased suicide rates and more domestic violence, Bloomberg reports.

And aggressive behavior online has also been linked to violence offline, found the study which was conducted on a sample of 4 billion tweets between 2014 and 2020 from US-based users.

According to the Council on Foreign Relations, a New York-based think tank, the exasperated messages have led to more violence against minorities, including mass shootings, lynchings and ethnic cleansing.

They used artificial intelligence to identify around 75 million hate messages in English, using the United Nations’ definition of online hate, which includes racial discrimination, misogyny and homophobia.

They then analyzed how the number of tweets changed as local temperatures rose or fell.

The researchers found that online hate speech increased as daily high temperatures rose above 21C (70F) – a ‘feel good’ point. Hate messages increased by 22% in warm weather, compared to average hate online during mild weather periods. Across all climate zones and socioeconomic groups in the United States, online tensions escalated even more when temperatures exceeded 30°C. Researchers observed that online hate speech increased by up to 24% – from the point of well-being – when temperatures reached 42°C to 45°C in US regions with hot and dry climates like some parts from Texas, Arizona, New Mexico and California. Last year, a study by the same researchers in Europe came to similar conclusions.

Social media reactions indicate how well people can adapt to high temperatures, said Annika Stechemesser, the study’s lead author.

She said if the temperatures get too hot or too cold, it has been found that there is an increase in hate speech online, regardless of socio-economic differences, religion or political beliefs.

“When discussing climate change, it’s important to remember that we feel the effects everywhere, not just in places where big disasters happen,” Stechemesser said. “There are places where the social consequences of the heat haven’t been discussed very thoroughly, especially how we can live together as a society and manage our well-being in the future.”

The researchers analyzed the tweets as a whole and did not look at specific incidents. That means there’s no way of knowing whether the weather escalated online tensions after the May 2020 killing of George Floyd, for example, or before the attack on the US Capitol in January 2021. Still, some conclusions can be drawn. ahead of the U.S. midterms on Nov. 8.

“Our results show that if September is particularly hot, we can expect to see more hate on Twitter,” Stechemesser said. “But the research doesn’t really show what kind of hate it is or on what topics – we don’t yet know if the hate we’re seeing is related to political issues.”

Europe, China and the United States have experienced drought and a series of heat waves this summer amid global warming of around 1.1°C on average since pre-industrial times.

The direct relationship between heat and hate online has also been documented in China, where researchers analyzed over 400 million tweets from a sample of 43 million users posting to the world’s largest microblogging platform. country, Sina Weibo. They concluded that days with temperatures above 35°C, rain, higher wind speeds, overcast skies and air pollution make people grumpier online.

“Of course people can to some degree consciously decide whether they want to be nice or not, but we still find that you’ll have more hateful behavior if you’re in a certain temperature range,” Stechemesser said. “The first thing to do is to limit global warming, this is the most obvious approach to solving this problem.”

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Online Study Increases Access to Degree Dreams Regardless of Life Stage https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/online-study-increases-access-to-degree-dreams-regardless-of-life-stage/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 23:24:50 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/online-study-increases-access-to-degree-dreams-regardless-of-life-stage/ As a result of Covid, many prospective students have put their degree dreams on hold, which has had a negative impact on their life options and employability. However, there has been a massive growth in the number and quality of online learning options, meaning successful study is within reach of everyone, regardless of education level […]]]>

As a result of Covid, many prospective students have put their degree dreams on hold, which has had a negative impact on their life options and employability. However, there has been a massive growth in the number and quality of online learning options, meaning successful study is within reach of everyone, regardless of education level or age. .

“The world has changed so much, and while online learning in years past was seen as the preserve of those who needed to earn money while learning, it has now become an attractive option for more people. of people who understand the importance of lifelong learning and developing their skills,” says Cynthia Olmesdahl, online strategist at Vega from the Independent Institute of Education.

“As the job market becomes more competitive than ever and the need for skills enhancement grows ever more pressing, it’s good to know that it really is never too late to earn your first degree. or a postgraduate degree, as the supply continues to increase.”

“A degree is no longer just the status symbol it once was, it has truly become the game-changer every professional needs to open new doors in their career. People of all ages are beginning to realize the importance of continuing their education.

For those who are hesitant to pursue further education, Olmesdahl notes the following:

  1. LIFELONG LEARNING IS NOT NEGOTIABLE

If you think college is only for people in their late teens and early twenties, think again. Your maturity and life experience means you’re probably in a much better position to really reap the benefits of higher education.

  1. STUDYING ONLINE IS MORE ATTRACTIVE THAN EVER

Online studies have always provided students with the freedom and flexibility to learn at their own pace and at home. This mode of study takes on all the more meaning today as the global environment remains volatile and uncertain.

  1. NO NEED TO BREAK YOUR LIFE FOR YOUR STUDIES

If your day-to-day responsibilities, such as your job or spending time with your family, prevent you from earning a degree, you have the option of studying part-time.

  1. MORE CANDIDATES MEANS GREATER COMPETITION

Whether you hope to improve your chances of landing your dream career or want to make greater progress in your career, studying for a degree will increase your chances and help you gain an edge.

  1. SELF REALIZATION LEADS TO FINDING YOUR PURPOSE

A degree can help you discover where your passion and purpose lie, and open doors to a range of new opportunities.

Earning a degree puts you on the fast track to success – opening your mind to new industries and worlds and helping you find the career that truly suits you. Own your way and find your purpose.

Study distance (online), full-time or part-time in 2023.

Visit vegaschool.com.

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Phew! The online study will not affect the Canadian work permit https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/phew-the-online-study-will-not-affect-the-canadian-work-permit-3/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/phew-the-online-study-will-not-affect-the-canadian-work-permit-3/ In a major relief for students choosing to study in Canada, the Canadian government has announced that these students will be eligible for Post-Graduation Work Permits (PGWP) even if they are studying online. The announcement comes amid huge delays in issuing student visas.The Canadian government has clarified that a student enrolled at a university in […]]]>

In a major relief for students choosing to study in Canada, the Canadian government has announced that these students will be eligible for Post-Graduation Work Permits (PGWP) even if they are studying online. The announcement comes amid huge delays in issuing student visas.
The Canadian government has clarified that a student enrolled at a university in the country and studying online from a country other than Canada will not have their work permit eligibility affected if they submit the study permit application before the 31 August 2022.

Students starting their program between September 1, 2022 and August 31, 2023 can take up to 50% of the course online without affecting their PGWP eligibility.
In addition, starting in September 2023, all study time spent outside of Canada will be deducted from the duration of the PGWP. This will help thousands of students whose visas have been delayed.

Visas pending
According to data from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), nearly 54% of student visa applications are pending. Like July 31,
2.1 million such apps
were pending. There have been
considerable increase in the number of students seeking study visas. As of July this year, 3.6 lakh applications have been finalized, up 31% from the corresponding period last year.
Nearly 4.5 lakh Indian students reached Canada in 2021, an all-time high. In 2020, when the pandemic was in effect, nearly 2.2 lakh Indian students landed in Canada. India accounts for nearly 35% of Canada’s international student population, followed by China, France and Iran.

Advice from the High Commission
Meanwhile, the High Commission of India in Ottawa, in a notice, has asked affected students to send a request for information and urgent processing of their student visa through the IRCC web form for to the study permit. He said that for students who wish to defer their admissions, universities communicate the options available to them, including deferring admission to a
term later.
Hemant Shah, director of Overseas Friends of India, says the pandemic caused the delay. Shah said parents should speak up about the delay and seek reimbursement from universities. “The number of Indians holding study visas, work permits and residence permits has doubled in the past two years,” Shah said.
Bhavin Thakkar of Careerline Education Foundation in Ahmedabad said almost 40% of student applications have been pending for more than three months. “Previously applications were processed in 1.5 months, but now it takes three months to get the approval letter and then the visa process starts. Only students who applied well in advance were granted visas, but many risk missing the September deadline.
This announcement by the Canadian government will benefit thousands of students,” said Thakkar.

The students speak
Sanjay Pillai, who studied film, applied for a degree in animation at Conestoga College in Kitchener, Ontario. His classes were due to start on September 6, but he is waiting
his visa.
“The policy allowing students to start their online courses from outside Canada was scheduled to end on August 31, 2022, but has now been extended to August 31, 2023. I have yet to receive official confirmation from college regarding the announcement, but the decision comes as a relief to students like me who have not yet obtained a visa,” Pillai said.
Varun Patel, another aspirant who applied for a PG degree in health care administration at Cape Breton University in Nova Scotia, said he was waiting for his visa. “I was worried about the timing, but now the Canadian government’s student-friendly approach has eased my concerns,” Patel said.

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