Online college – Online College Offers http://onlinecollegeoffers.net/ Sun, 20 Nov 2022 18:16:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-15.png Online college – Online College Offers http://onlinecollegeoffers.net/ 32 32 Using Online College Rankings and Reviews https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/using-online-college-rankings-and-reviews/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 16:17:58 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/using-online-college-rankings-and-reviews/ Many students looking for a college do their research online. When viewing websites, many rankings and reviews give students college information, the campus and the instructors. As with any research, you must use a platform that you trust if you want the best results. If you’re looking to get a specific degree and need help […]]]>

Many students looking for a college do their research online. When viewing websites, many rankings and reviews give students college information, the campus and the instructors. As with any research, you must use a platform that you trust if you want the best results.

If you’re looking to get a specific degree and need help knowing where to turn, school and college exams are some of the best places to look. Remember that no review is perfect and there is always a risk of bias, even in the best-built site – you should use your own judgment to determine which colleges are right for you.

In the library – Asian female student with books working in university library.

Why use online rankings?

Online college reviews are invaluable for getting a general overview of a school. Even the most basic online college rankings are a great way to get an overview of the schools you’re interested in and can help you narrow down your options if you have too many colleges to choose from.

Using rankings like this lets you quickly compare colleges at a glance, either with overall ratings or judging individual parts of their total score. Different platforms rank and review colleges in different ways, but within each platform, the college ranking system is usually consistent.

This means you can see how each school stacks up against its peers, allowing you to find the best of the best while narrowing down to college options that would be practical for your coursework needs. With careful research, you might even find reviews from academics who worked there before.

The only caveat is that these rankings and reviews only take into account parts of a college experience. If you care about the size of a school, whether there is a strong or not-so-strong athletics program, etc., you will have to read other sources to understand these things.

How to Find University Reviews Online

It is not so difficult to find sites that house a treasure of various college journals, but you should always use common sense when watching what they say. For example, you might end up finding a bias towards a particular college or even stumble upon paid reviews on blogging sites.

Instead, opt for platforms like Authority.org. These provide effective ways to see a comprehensive breakdown of what a particular school has to offer based on input from both students and academics, as well as general research. Being able to narrow down your criteria also allows you to create an online listing for specific degrees rather than having to compare colleges as is.

Thanks to platforms like this, it is extremely easy to reduce the list of colleges you want to attend, making absolutely sure that the only options left are the ones you are actually considering. From there, just compare them all to find the one that gives you the best academic prospects, the best facilities, or the overall quality of education.

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“Regular and Substantial Interaction” in Online College https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/regular-and-substantial-interaction-in-online-college/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 08:03:18 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/regular-and-substantial-interaction-in-online-college/ In 2017, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Inspector General audited Western Governors University and labeled it a “correspondence education” provider rather than a “distance education” provider. Only online colleges that offer “regular and substantial interaction” between faculty members and students are considered distance education providers; those who fail are in the field of […]]]>

In 2017, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Inspector General audited Western Governors University and labeled it a “correspondence education” provider rather than a “distance education” provider.

Only online colleges that offer “regular and substantial interaction” between faculty members and students are considered distance education providers; those who fail are in the field of distance education. The regulation aims to prevent bad actors to access federal financial aid funds for classes devoid of human interaction. The Inspector General found that nearly two-thirds (62 percent) of Western Governors students in the 2014 audit sample took at least one course that did not meet the requirements for distance learning. This discovery exceeded the government’s 50% limit, prompting the government to tell western governors to repay $713 million in federal financial aid funds.

Later, in 2019, the Department of Education’s Office of Federal Student Assistance ruled that western governors did not have to pay, citing “the ambiguity of the law and regulations and the lack of clear guidance available at the time of the audit period.” That ambiguity continues to this day, even as the Department of Education and colleges across the country push each other toward greater clarity about what “regular and substantial interaction” means in distance learning.

“We have to be careful what we ask for, because we might get it,” said Russell Poulin, executive director of WCET and vice president of technology-enabled education at the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, noting that they want advice. it is as clear as possible. The commission, which advocates for digital learning in post-secondary education, analyzes, interprets and attempts to provide examples of what Ministry of Education policies might look like in practice so that its member institutions adhere to the guidelines at times unwritten.

To be clear, the colleges and the Department of Education appear to be engaging in this dialogue in good faith. That is, they share a goal of protecting students as consumers and ensuring that federal financial aid money is spent wisely. But here’s the conundrum: if the Department of Education provides too much guidance on what “regular and substantial interaction” means, colleges may struggle to design and deliver creative, quality programs that meet needs of their unique student populations. At the same time, if the Department of Education provides too little guidance, colleges may violate unarticulated rules.

In 2018, through a negotiated rulemaking process, the Trump administration sought to allow greater regulatory flexibility in distance learning by defining “regular and substantial interaction” as meeting the standard if it satisfied two out of five conditions“to provide direct instruction; evaluate or provide feedback on a student’s work; provide information or answer questions about the content of a course or skill; lead a group discussion on the content of a course or skill; or other educational activities approved by the institution’s or program’s accrediting body. But this standard has drawn criticism, especially since the last criterion allowed institutions to define “substantial” themselves.

Last year, Kathryn Kerensky, WCET’s director of digital learning, policy and compliance, wrote to the Department of Education asking additional and specific questions about the definition of “regular and substantial interaction.” in distance education. The communication was part of a series of requests in these last years who have sought to unravel the meaning of “regular and substantial interaction”. Note a WCET 2016 blog postco-authored by Poulin, which offers a remarkable amount of interpretation on the Department for Education’s incomplete guidance on “regular and substantial interaction” in online learning, contributing to its status as the most-read publication on the site, according to Poulin.

The Education Department responded to Kerensky’s latest questions in a letter dated March. (The letter was “delayed in transitas Kerensky received it in October.) As has been the case in this modern saga, the letter delivered both new insights and unanswered questions.

New guidelines on “regular and substantial”

The 2022 edition of the Department of Education letter at WCET offered new guidance on what “regular and substantial interaction” means in distance education. Specifically, direct teaching means “live synchronous teaching where the instructor and the student are online and communicating at the same time”.

“That clarity was very helpful,” Poulin said, noting that member institutions had had different interpretations, including some that saw asynchronous video conferencing as direct teaching. Asynchronous videos can still be a value-added component of a course, Poulin noted, but they can’t “count” as part of direct teaching.

Scheduled office hours “can partially meet the requirement for regular interaction between instructors and students,” according to the letter. This too was helpful, as some WCET member institutions had reported that some members of the financial aid community disagreed with this interpretation.

In addition, the Department of Education claimed that it defers to accreditors regarding the qualifications of instructors necessary to provide “substantial interaction.” To date, colleges have not been clear, for example, whether teaching assistants, graduate students, or team teaching could count toward this requirement. In the 2017 case against Western Governors, the government raised concerns about inadequate faculty roles in the institution’s distance learning courses. (The competency-based university has an atypical faculty model which has several people performing traditional teaching roles.) Although the letter from the Department of Education did not settle this question, it did indicate where colleges could find the answer, which Poulin said was a trend “very helpful” in Ministry of Education responses in recent years.

Persistent questions about “regular and substantial”

Some colleges have been unclear about the extent to which instructors must engage in online group discussions for an activity to be considered regular and substantial interaction. For example, one institution reported that some online faculty members had developed patterns for initiating discussions and only came back to the discussion at the end to grade them, according to the Department of Education. letter. On the question of hiring instructors, the Education Department plans to respond on a case-by-case basis.

“What is the evidence that an institution could provide to demonstrate this? Poulin asked, noting that college administrators could, for example, coordinate efforts with campus units that can pull data from learning management systems. “It would have been nice to see some examples.”

“With compliance, you want to have these standards in black and white,” Kerensky said. “It is difficult for institutions not to have clear answers. But the downside of having very prescriptive standards is that there’s no room to grow outside of that. We appreciate their perspective by leaving some things open.

Some colleges have asked for guidance on the type of evidence that might show that faculty are interacting in a substantial way with students, especially since the Department of Education had previously declared that institutions do not need to “document the exact time spent on a particular type of substantive interaction”. In this most recent letter, the Department of Education confirmed previous guidance that institutions should maintain policies or procedures that “create expectations for faculty to meaningfully interact with students,” but it declined to comment further on how institutions might implement and enforce these policies.

WCET member institutions also sought the department’s guidance on how the design of the program could show that interactions between instructors and students were “prompt and proactive”, as required by regulations. Earlier, the ministry had noted that institutions are not required to document “every” interaction. But in the most recent communication, the agency declined to offer criteria, such as policies or metrics, for determining whether interactions are timely and proactive. Instead, the Department for Education said it would be on a case-by-case basis.

When college administrators and faculty members don’t know how to comply with Department of Education rules, it would be wise to have defensible processes, Kerensky said. That is, a college’s policy for supporting regular and substantial interaction must be clear and must articulate a procedure to ensure that the policy is enforced. Additionally, administrators and faculty should be able to explain why the policy and procedures are what they are. This way, if an audited institution is cited for a violation, its defense will be ready.

This bureaucratic dance between the Department of Education and online colleges may be flawed, but neither side seems motivated to change the status quo on how it negotiates distance learning requirements.

“We’re trying to push the ministry to be as clear as possible, but also to be careful what we’re asking for,” Poulin said, pausing for a moment before reiterating, “we don’t want to push them too far.”

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Blip in Online College Enrollment Doesn’t Mean What You Think https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/blip-in-online-college-enrollment-doesnt-mean-what-you-think/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 17:10:34 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/blip-in-online-college-enrollment-doesnt-mean-what-you-think/ Los Angeles, CA – September 27: A student stands at East Los Angeles College on Tuesday September 27, … [+] 2022 in Los Angeles, California. This year, many students are choosing to stick with online classes despite the full opening of California community college campuses. (Dania Maxwell/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images) Los Angeles Times […]]]>

Several fully online colleges have reported notable increases in enrollment among students of more or less traditional age – those between 18 and 24 years old. It’s a short story. But that probably doesn’t mean what most people think it means.

The news is easy. Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU) online college has grown from 135,000 students in March 2020 to 175,000 today. Western Governors University (WGU) reported an increase in the number of traditional-aged students, from approximately 6,000 students in 2017 to 15,000 students in 2022. At the University of Maryland Global Campus (UMGC), also entirely in online, reported enrollment of under-24s rose from nearly 4,300 students in 2017 to 5,700 students this year.

It’s awesome. It’s good when people continue their studies.

But that probably doesn’t mean, as some experts have proposed, that young people have changed their minds about online education and now see it as a suitable substitute for attending a traditional on-campus college or university. In other words, rising enrollment doesn’t represent a significant shift in how people think about online colleges — and more often than not, those thoughts aren’t positive.

There are several reasons why the surge in enrollment probably doesn’t mean that people’s impressions of online schools have changed.

The first is that measuring enrollment in a few schools might seem like a big deal, but when you look at the numbers as a share of college-aged youth, the increase is almost invisible. A survey published this year showed that “before the pandemic, 0.28% of secondary school respondents said they planned to attend university entirely online. By 2022, that figure has more than doubled to 0.72%.”

More than doubled. It is worthy of interest. Less than three quarters of one percent. Call this change what you will, but it’s not a change in perception, at least not of any magnitude.

Look at it this way – national education statistics show that since the start of the pandemic in 2020, “total undergraduate enrollment has fallen by almost 1.4 million – or 9.4% “. Some of the reported new growth in the number of younger students attending online schools took place before the pandemic, but even if you count everything, these three schools – WGU, SNHU and UMGC have seen increases in enrollments of about 50,000 students. That’s less than 4% of the 1.4 million undergraduates who have withdrawn from higher education since 2020.

Again, it’s good. But we are talking – at most – of 3.5% of this, of which 80% of this increase comes from a single school, the SNHU.

But in an effort to sell the narrative that young people feel better about teaching entirely online, some have cited this study from Northeastern University. In this narrative and alongside this increase in enrollment, this study is reported as showing “that almost three-quarters (71%) of employers perceive online study credentials as equivalent or better than those obtained in person.”

But let me report the same study this way – according to Northeastern University, as of last year, almost a third (31%) of senior executives said a degree earned online was “generally of high quality. less than those obtained in person.”

In other words, seeing a nice surge in college enrollment doesn’t mean the underlying terrain for online programs is changing. It’s still pretty bad.

By stepping back, it’s easy to analyze what’s really going on, what these gains really show. Rather than representing a change in perception, it is rather clear that some young people are taking ginger baby steps as they enter or re-enter college.

Given the utter chaos and terrible results many of us have seen over the past two years – ZoomU anyone? – it is difficult to blame them. Now that some college students are starting to date again, it’s easy to see that they aren’t quite ready to fully commit just yet. It’s the college equivalent of the millions of people acknowledging the pandemic is “over,” but still aren’t quite ready to eat out or travel. In college, which is a bigger decision than dinner, some people are likely not quite ready to go through with it yet.

If things go wrong, virus variants appear, or hidden terms reappear, fully online college programs are likely to be the least disrupted. They tend to be easier to start and easier to stop or pause. It’s reasonable middle ground and a safe place to start, all things considered.

It is also most likely an important factor that these online-only schools advertise a lot. Most traditional schools don’t – at least not with non-stop national television commercials. If people regret their decision to quit college or are a little more cautious than normal, ads that emphasize the convenience of online learning are clearly a factor.

It is true that some online-only schools invest in quality. WGU does, for example. Speaking of which, their competency model is an entirely different approach than most schools and probably shouldn’t be counted alongside SNHU and others.

The lingering fact though is that most for-profit subprime schools are online only. And that taints the entire offer – a condition that is unlikely to change. Yes, some younger students are returning to school. And, yes, some of them go to online-only schools, but that’s a fraction of a fraction and almost certainly isn’t a significant shift in sentiment. Despite what you may hear.

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Are online college courses worth it? https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/are-online-college-courses-worth-it-2/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/are-online-college-courses-worth-it-2/ You may have decided it’s time to graduate. You’ve considered the traditional approach of taking classes on a college campus, but maybe you don’t have the time or interest in this type of education. You may have heard of taking online courses and wondered: are they worth it? Online college courses allow you to complete […]]]>

You may have decided it’s time to graduate. You’ve considered the traditional approach of taking classes on a college campus, but maybe you don’t have the time or interest in this type of education. You may have heard of taking online courses and wondered: are they worth it?

Online college courses allow you to complete your studies and earn your degree entirely from your computer. You will create your own time to study and have the flexibility to balance life and school.

Here are some essential questions to help you decide if online courses are worth it.

What are the benefits of taking online courses?

Taking online courses has many benefits, and here are some important reasons why online courses can be worth it:

  • Cost. One of the biggest misconceptions about online classes is that they’re just as expensive as going to college in person. By taking online courses, you could save money on additional expenses associated with traditional colleges, such as gas, housing, and meals and dining facilities. Your tuition may also be more reasonable, as some schools, such as Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU), have not raised online tuition in over a decade.
  • Flexibility. Online courses are flexible and versatile and offer the opportunity to earn a degree at your own pace. You can fit your school schedule into your life in whatever way works best for you.

While these are a few benefits that online courses offer, it’s important to remember that every educational experience is unique.

What are some of the most common challenges for students in online courses?

While there are several advantages to taking college courses online, there are also some challenges you should be aware of.

Here are some common challenges for online learners and tips for overcoming them:

Entertainment

While distractions aren’t exclusive to online students, they can still affect them. Distractions can be anything from phone notifications to the lure of the outdoors when you really need to focus on your schoolwork.

One way to overcome distractions is to stick to a schedule and manage your time well. If you need help with possible distractions, schools like SNHU have educational counselors to support your academic success and help you overcome potential obstacles.

Motivation

Without having a physical classroom or a set time to be somewhere, staying motivated to take your classes comes down to discipline. Sometimes events also occur that can make you lose motivation, such as seniority, which impacts students near the end of their program and can cause them to become less consistent with studying and completing assignments.

One way to stay motivated is to remind yourself of your “why”. Why are you going to school? Bringing this “why” to your attention can help rekindle the fire that motivated you to go to school in the first place.

Commitment

One of the hardest parts of learning online can be building relationships with your instructors and classmates. Feeling connected with your peers can seem difficult when you can’t see them face to face all the time.

Some college courses, like those you’ll find at SNHU, provide environments for discussing weekly topics in a collective space. These chats are a great space to introduce yourself to your peers and make those remote connections on a consistent basis.

Understanding and being aware of these challenges and ways to overcome them can set you up for success in the digital classroom.

How to Succeed in the Digital Classroom

If you’re considering online courses, it helps to know what you can expect as an online student. For example, you will be responsible for managing your time. Without the scheduled hours in class to study and get work done, you’ll have to set aside time each week to focus on your studies.

Time management goes hand in hand with organization. Reading your course outline as soon as you can access it is a great way to get going and start planning your semester. You’ll be able to identify when big projects are due, so you can be sure to book extra time in advance.

There is no “one size fits all” for maintaining organization and time management. Instead, you can develop a system designed for your preferences. Finding the best system for you may take some experimenting and trial and error, but eventually you will find the best practices to foster personal success.

Is online the right option for you?

Online college courses offer flexibility to fit your life. Considering an online degree program that meets your individual needs can set you up for success. You’ll want to investigate the different fields of study offered and the different degree programs available and find the one that will help you achieve your goals.

Before you fully commit to college, you’ll want to ask yourself some important questions such as:

  • Will I receive a complete and accredited education?
  • Will this school help me achieve my educational and professional goals?
  • What resources and support does this school offer to help me succeed?

Whether you’re just starting out or looking to go back to school, it’s important to consider the type of degree you’re looking for. Degrees include:

Also, if you have already earned college credits, you may be able to transfer those credits to reduce the time it takes to complete your program. If you’re ready to transition to an online degree program, your next step might be to work with an online admissions counselor to get started.

Once you know the college you want has everything you need to succeed, you’re ready to take the plunge with your online education.

A degree can change your life. Find the SNHU online college degree that can best help you achieve your goals.

Nicholas Patterson is a writer at Southern New Hampshire University. Connect with him on LinkedIn.

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Citizens will acquire an online university planning platform https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/citizens-will-acquire-an-online-university-planning-platform/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 15:18:20 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/citizens-will-acquire-an-online-university-planning-platform/ Photo of James Sanna | Banking and merchant staff Providence-based Citizens Financial Group Inc. plans to acquire an online college planning platform that the bank says would boost its ability to advise prospective students. The Citizens said in a statement yesterday that they had agreed to acquire Iowa-based College Raptor Inc. Terms of the agreement […]]]>

Photo of James Sanna | Banking and merchant staff

Providence-based Citizens Financial Group Inc. plans to acquire an online college planning platform that the bank says would boost its ability to advise prospective students.

The Citizens said in a statement yesterday that they had agreed to acquire Iowa-based College Raptor Inc. Terms of the agreement were not disclosed. The bank said it expects to complete the transaction in the fourth quarter.

Founded in 2012, College Raptor offers a college planning platform that matches prospective students with suitable schools based on academics and finances. It also offers tools to help prospective students assess and select a college, including side-by-side comparisons of estimated aid programs, scores indicating how well a college matches a student’s situation, and chances of admission.

“The acquisition of College Raptor provides unique opportunities to engage with prospective students and their families as they navigate the college search and selection process,” said Chris Ebeling, executive vice president and chief loan officer. students at Citizens, in the press release. “This innovative platform further strengthens our ability to provide personalized advice and information during this important stage of their lives, while reinforcing our commitment to financial empowerment. We are committed to providing our younger generation of customers with the digital support and services they need throughout their financial journey. »

Upon closing of the transaction, College Raptor will operate as a wholly owned subsidiary of Citizens, the statement said.

“College Raptor’s mission is to empower students and their families to plan their college journey, and this combination will strengthen our capabilities while connecting users with a premier financial partner,” said Bill Staib, CEO and co-founder of College Raptor. , said in the statement. “With Citizens, we look forward to expanding our platform and providing families with a richer and more valuable overall experience to help them achieve their educational and financial dreams.”

Citizens offers several loan and refinance products for students, graduates and parents.

“Citizens is a longtime advocate for financial empowerment and reaches families through innovative partnerships in the communities it serves,” the statement read. “This acquisition will continue those efforts by providing training and resources to help people make informed financial decisions.”

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Are online college courses worth it? https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/are-online-college-courses-worth-it/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/are-online-college-courses-worth-it/ You may have decided it’s time to graduate. You’ve considered the traditional approach of taking classes on a college campus, but maybe you don’t have the time or interest in this type of education. You may have heard of taking online courses and wondered: are they worth it? Online college courses allow you to complete […]]]>

You may have decided it’s time to graduate. You’ve considered the traditional approach of taking classes on a college campus, but maybe you don’t have the time or interest in this type of education. You may have heard of taking online courses and wondered: are they worth it?

Online college courses allow you to complete your studies and earn your degree entirely from your computer. You will create your own time to study and have the flexibility to balance life and school.

Here are some essential questions to help you decide if online courses are worth it.

What are the benefits of taking online courses?

Taking online courses has many benefits, and here are some important reasons why online courses can be worth it:

  • Cost. One of the biggest misconceptions about online classes is that they’re just as expensive as going to college in person. By taking online courses, you could save money on additional expenses associated with traditional colleges, such as gas, housing, and meals and dining facilities. Your tuition may also be more reasonable, as some schools, such as Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU), have not raised online tuition in over a decade.
  • Flexibility. Online courses are flexible and versatile and offer the opportunity to earn a degree at your own pace. You can fit your school schedule into your life in whatever way works best for you.

While these are a few benefits that online courses offer, it’s important to remember that every educational experience is unique.

What are some of the most common challenges for students in online courses?

While there are several advantages to taking college courses online, there are also some challenges you should be aware of.

Here are some common challenges for online learners and tips for overcoming them:

Entertainment

While distractions aren’t exclusive to online students, they can still affect them. Distractions can be anything from phone notifications to the lure of the outdoors when you really need to focus on your schoolwork.

One way to overcome distractions is to stick to a schedule and manage your time well. If you need help with possible distractions, schools like SNHU have educational counselors to support your academic success and help you overcome potential obstacles.

Motivation

Without having a physical classroom or a set time to be somewhere, staying motivated to take your classes comes down to discipline. Sometimes events also occur that can make you lose motivation, such as seniority, which impacts students near the end of their program and can cause them to become less consistent with studying and completing assignments.

One way to stay motivated is to remind yourself of your “why”. Why are you going to school? Bringing this “why” to your attention can help rekindle the fire that motivated you to go to school in the first place.

Commitment

One of the hardest parts of learning online can be building relationships with your instructors and classmates. Feeling connected with your peers can seem difficult when you can’t see them face to face all the time.

Some college courses, like those you’ll find at SNHU, provide environments for discussing weekly topics in a collective space. These chats are a great space to introduce yourself to your peers and make those remote connections on a consistent basis.

Understanding and being aware of these challenges and ways to overcome them can set you up for success in the digital classroom.

How to Succeed in the Digital Classroom

If you’re considering online courses, it helps to know what you can expect as an online student. For example, you will be responsible for managing your time. Without the scheduled hours in class to study and get work done, you’ll have to set aside time each week to focus on your studies.

Time management goes hand in hand with organization. Reading your course syllabus as soon as you can access it is a great way to get going and start planning your semester. You’ll be able to identify when big projects are due, so you can be sure to book extra time in advance.

There is no “one size fits all” for maintaining organization and time management. Instead, you can develop a system designed for your preferences. Finding the best system for you may take some experimenting and trial and error, but eventually you will find the best practices to foster personal success.

Is online the right option for you?

Online college courses offer flexibility to fit your life. Considering an online degree program that meets your individual needs can set you up for success. You’ll want to investigate the different fields of study offered and the different degree programs available and find the one that will help you achieve your goals.

Before you fully commit to college, you’ll want to ask yourself some important questions such as:

  • Will I receive a complete and accredited education?
  • Will this school help me achieve my educational and professional goals?
  • What resources and support does this school offer to help me succeed?

Whether you’re just starting out or looking to go back to school, it’s important to consider the type of degree you’re looking for. Degrees include:

Also, if you have already earned college credits, you may be able to transfer those credits to reduce the time it takes to complete your program. If you’re ready to transition to an online degree program, your next step might be to work with an online admissions counselor to get started.

Once you know the college you want has everything you need to succeed, you’re ready to take the plunge with your online education.

A degree can change your life. Find the SNHU online college degree that can best help you achieve your goals.

Nicholas Patterson is a writer at Southern New Hampshire University. Connect with him on LinkedIn.

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Connecting Local Football Program to Online College in California https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/connecting-local-football-program-to-online-college-in-california/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/connecting-local-football-program-to-online-college-in-california/ ROANOKE, Va. – Finger pointing and blame play. Our investigation into the fallout from a local football program took another turn. 10 News has been studying the South Forest community’s Christian program for weeks, and it appears this story goes beyond Roanoke, reaching as far as California. Since our first reports, Pope Mitchell, sporting director […]]]>

ROANOKE, Va. – Finger pointing and blame play. Our investigation into the fallout from a local football program took another turn.

10 News has been studying the South Forest community’s Christian program for weeks, and it appears this story goes beyond Roanoke, reaching as far as California.

Since our first reports, Pope Mitchell, sporting director and head coach of the SFCC, has resigned.

But after speaking to former players and an assistant coach, many believe the root of the program was much bigger than him.

Where does the funding come from?

When we sat down with Mitchell in July, he was adamant that his team was funded by Community Christian College, an online school in Redlands, California.

“Funding comes from organizations and academics. To be eligible for our program, you must take classes through CCC,” Mitchell said in this interview.

CCC was quick to deny these claims, telling 10 News that they had no affiliation with the Roanoke team.

We spoke with a CCC athletic director, Tracy Davis, who said he and Community Christian College had nothing to do with the SFCC.

“Community Christian College has nothing to do with this and they continue to be involved,” Davis said over the phone.

Davis has a theory as to why they’re involved – because Mitchell is his son.

“You don’t know the story, it’s an attack from there because of my son. And I know it,” Davis said.

But since airing our first stories about the SFCC program’s broken promises, we’ve obtained documents that may suggest CCC’s involvement. The first, a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between an assistant coach, CCC president Brian Carroll, and Davis.


10 News inquired about the memorandum of understanding, asking Davis why their names appear if they’re not involved, and he told us this:

Davis: The one you’re talking about with Virginia isn’t real. This is not a contract that I signed or that Brian signed.

Alyssa: So do you think Pope modified it to put Roanoke Virginia in it?

Davis: It is our belief. That’s all I can tell you.


However, this MOU was sent from Davis’ email account to Mitchell in 2020 when the SFCC program had just started. We sent this evidence to CCC, and they responded by saying, “It looks like the documents are all made up.

This was just the beginning of communications between Davis and the Roanoke team.

In 2020, he sent Austin Wilhelm, a former Alleghany High School catcher, an email welcoming him to the Bobcats program — something Davis denies ever doing.


Alyssa: The welcome letter you re-sent to players from your account, welcoming them to the Bobcats.

Davis: I do not send welcome letters, they are not my children.

Alyssa: We have them in your CCC email saying “Welcome to the Bobcats”.


Another connection between the home team and the California college is the $1,500 athletic fee that Wilhelm said CCC added to his bill.

Wilhelm says the college is still calling trying to raise money, despite leaving the team two years ago before even playing a game.


Davis: He is not a CCC player and has nothing to do with CCC.

Alyssa: So why do we have a receipt from a player, a transcript, that CCC took $1,500 for sports fees when he’s not playing for CCC. Why would they do that?

Davis: If you read the memorandum of understanding, it tells them what they will get in a memorandum of understanding.


But remember, CCC and Davis previously said the MOU deal wasn’t real.

Regarding funding, Davis explained in an email to Mitchell sent in 2020 how CCC is paid by players who enroll in college.

“So whatever is booked is what we will be compensated for,” Davis’ email read. “We will not get fees for students who have not completed financial aid.”

On the phone, however, Davis claimed he had no knowledge of it.


Alyssa: If CCC can explain why they charge FAFSA $1500 per player for kids, and don’t say MOU because they said MOU is made up.

Davis: I’m not part of that, that, in particular, I don’t know how it happens.


However, Davis sent Mitchell another email with a student consent form for an athletic program fee form that he told Mitchell his players had to fill out. This fee, again, is listed at $1,500.

We asked CCC about sports fees and they replied, “Any questions regarding the use of funds, please spend some time on our website. We fund both on-campus and off-campus students to play sports.

There was no further explanation as to why this fee was applied to athletes from Virginia who are not recognized by the CCC. Mitchell explained it from the start.


Pope Mitchell: That’s where our funding comes from, is that once they’ve taken courses through CCC, those funds for those people will come back to us athletically.

Alyssa: So CCC gives you funds if the kids sign up?

Pope Mitchell: Yes.


This notion is reiterated yet again by someone affiliated with the CCC through an email from an athletic director on the college campus in Mitchell in 2021. There was a football roster attachment and SFCC players who have not applied for the FAFSA. The email goes on to say, “without this part being completed, the funds cannot be withdrawn.”

We’ve spoken with many players who believe Mitchell had good intentions but the money Davis pledged to their program rarely went to their program. They also said Mitchell paid for much of the cost himself.

Mitchell said all he wants is for players who think they can’t make it to have a chance to try.

No one from Community Christian College or South Forest Community Christian has been charged or charged with criminal misconduct in connection with the SFCC Bobcats program.

Despite numerous documents contradicting the CCC’s position, the college stands by its original statement: It has no connection with the South Forest Christian community.

In response to our findings, Brian Carroll, President of CCC, provided this statement to 10 News:

“This is an unfortunate event, and we appreciate Alyssa Rae of WSLS for bringing this to our attention. We will do everything we can to help. Community Christian College is offering Roanoke students the opportunity to play for our NJCAA Division 1 in California and Michigan or will provide them with a full refund, while allowing them to retain all grades and courses.

Brian Carroll, CCC Chair

Copyright 2022 by WSLS 10 – All rights reserved.

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Connecting Local Football Program to Online College in California https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/connecting-local-football-program-to-online-college-in-california-2/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/connecting-local-football-program-to-online-college-in-california-2/ ROANOKE, Va. – Finger pointing and blame play. Our investigation of the spin-off from a local football program took yet another turn. 10 News looked at the South Forest Community Christian Program for weeks and it seems this story goes beyond Roanoke, stretching all the way to California. Since our first reports Pope Mitchellthe sporting […]]]>

ROANOKE, Va. – Finger pointing and blame play. Our investigation of the spin-off from a local football program took yet another turn.

10 News looked at the South Forest Community Christian Program for weeks and it seems this story goes beyond Roanoke, stretching all the way to California.

Since our first reports Pope Mitchellthe sporting director and head coach of the SFCC, resigned.

But after talk to former players and assistant coach, many believe the root of the program was much bigger than him.

Where does the funding come from?

When we sat down with Mitchell in July, he was adamant that his team was funded by Community Christian College, an online school in Redlands, California.

“Funding comes from organizations and academics. To be eligible for our program, you must take classes through CCC,” Mitchell said in this interview.

CCC was quick to deny these claims, telling 10 News that they had no affiliation with the Roanoke team.

We spoke with a CCC athletic director, Tracy Davis, who said he and Community Christian College had nothing to do with the SFCC.

“Community Christian College has nothing to do with this and they continue to be involved,” Davis said over the phone.

Davis has a theory as to why they’re involved – because Mitchell is his son.

“You don’t know the story, it’s an attack from there because of my son. And I know it,” Davis said.

But since airing our first stories about the SFCC program’s broken promises, we’ve obtained documents that may suggest CCC’s involvement. The first, a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between an assistant coach, CCC president Brian Carroll, and Davis.


10 News inquired about the memorandum of understanding, asking Davis why their names appear if they’re not involved, and he told us this:

Davis: The one you’re talking about with Virginia isn’t real. This is not a contract that I signed or that Brian signed.

Alyssa: So do you think Pope modified it to put Roanoke Virginia in it?

Davis: It is our belief. That’s all I can tell you.


However, this MOU was sent from Davis’ email account to Mitchell in 2020 when the SFCC program had just started. We sent this evidence to CCC, and they responded by saying, “It looks like the documents are all made up.

This was just the beginning of communications between Davis and the Roanoke team.

In 2020, he sent Austin Wilhelm, a former Alleghany High School catcher, an email welcoming him to the Bobcats program — something Davis denies ever doing.


Alyssa: The welcome letter you re-sent to players from your account, welcoming them to the Bobcats.

Davis: I do not send welcome letters, they are not my children.

Alyssa: We have them in your CCC email saying “Welcome to the Bobcats”.


Another connection between the home team and the California college is the $1,500 athletic fee that Wilhelm said CCC added to his bill.

Wilhelm says the college is still calling trying to raise money, despite leaving the team two years ago before even playing a game.


Davis: He is not a CCC player and has nothing to do with CCC.

Alyssa: So why do we have a receipt from a player, a transcript, that CCC took $1,500 for sports fees when he’s not playing for CCC. Why would they do that?

Davis: If you read the memorandum of understanding, it tells them what they will get in a memorandum of understanding.


But remember, CCC and Davis previously said the MOU deal wasn’t real.

Regarding funding, Davis explained in an email to Mitchell sent in 2020 how CCC is paid by players who enroll in college.

“So whatever is booked is what we will be compensated for,” Davis’ email read. “We will not get fees for students who have not completed financial aid.”

On the phone, however, Davis claimed he had no knowledge of it.


Alyssa: If CCC can explain why they charge FAFSA $1500 per player for kids, and don’t say MOU because they said MOU is made up.

Davis: I’m not part of that, that, in particular, I don’t know how it happens.


However, Davis sent Mitchell another email with a student consent form for an athletic program fee form that he told Mitchell his players had to fill out. This fee, again, is listed at $1,500.

We asked CCC about sports fees and they replied, “Any questions regarding the use of funds, please spend some time on our website. We fund both on-campus and off-campus students to play sports.

There was no further explanation as to why this fee was applied to athletes from Virginia who are not recognized by the CCC. Mitchell explained it from the start.


Pope Mitchell: That’s where our funding comes from, is that once they’ve taken courses through CCC, those funds for those people will come back to us athletically.

Alyssa: So CCC gives you funds if the kids sign up?

Pope Mitchell: Yes.


This notion is reiterated yet again by someone affiliated with the CCC through an email from an athletic director on the college campus in Mitchell in 2021. There was a football roster attachment and SFCC players who have not applied for the FAFSA. The email goes on to say, “without this part being completed, the funds cannot be withdrawn.”

We’ve spoken with many players who believe Mitchell had good intentions but the money Davis pledged to their program rarely went to their program. They also said Mitchell paid for much of the cost himself.

Mitchell said all he wants is for players who think they can’t make it to have a chance to try.

No one from Community Christian College or South Forest Community Christian has been charged or charged with criminal misconduct in connection with the SFCC Bobcats program.

Despite numerous documents contradicting the CCC’s position, the college stands by its original statement: It has no connection with the South Forest Christian community.

In response to our findings, Brian Carroll, President of CCC, provided this statement to 10 News:

“This is an unfortunate event, and we appreciate Alyssa Rae of WSLS for bringing this to our attention. We will do everything we can to help. Community Christian College is offering Roanoke students the opportunity to play for our NJCAA Division 1 in California and Michigan or will provide them with a full refund, while allowing them to retain all grades and courses.

Brian Carroll, CCC Chair

Copyright 2022 by WSLS 10 – All rights reserved.

]]>
What to Know About Online College as an International Student – Forbes Advisor https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/what-to-know-about-online-college-as-an-international-student-forbes-advisor/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 21:46:36 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/what-to-know-about-online-college-as-an-international-student-forbes-advisor/ Editorial Note: We earn a commission on partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect the opinions or ratings of our editors. International students can enroll in US programs online to expand their education options, save money, and add flexibility to their learning. However, learners from other countries who wish to study in the […]]]>

Editorial Note: We earn a commission on partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect the opinions or ratings of our editors.

International students can enroll in US programs online to expand their education options, save money, and add flexibility to their learning. However, learners from other countries who wish to study in the United States must meet strict requirements, especially amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Online education for international students can provide significant benefits to international students. This guide explores online programs for international students, including information on visas, credit requirements, online program benefits, and tuition fees.

What to Consider When Finding an Online College

International students considering an online university have many options, so the process can seem overwhelming. When researching potential schools, be sure to ask yourself the following questions.

Do they offer online programs for international students?

If you find an American school that offers online learning, make sure they offer programs for international students. For example, international learners cannot enroll in US-based 100% online programs, but they are allowed to enroll in blended courses.

Prior to COVID-19, international students could only enroll in one online course per semester. However, as of March 2020, the US government relaxed this restriction, allowing international enrollees to participate in blended learning.

Can you do 100% online work, or is it hybrid?

International students cannot complete fully online programs at US institutions. They can, however, enroll in hybrid programs, which combine online and in-person learning. Registrants have several options for taking hybrid programs, including taking courses with local partner institutions.

How much is tuition for international students?

Tuition fees vary depending on whether the school is public or private and whether the student is pursuing undergraduate or graduate studies. US schools may allow international learners to pay in-state tuition, which generally costs less than out-of-state tuition.

On average, international undergraduate students pay annual tuition fees of $25,000 to $35,000 at private schools and $30,000 to $45,000 or more at private institutions. At the undergraduate and postgraduate levels, enrollees pay an average of $20,000 to $35,000 annually in public institutions and $35,000 to $50,000 in private schools.

Is the online program accredited?

Accreditation is a process by which schools undergo voluntary and rigorous review by third-party organizations to ensure certain quality standards. Online programs are not accredited specifically for their distance learning offerings, but their host schools may hold accreditation at the institutional and programmatic levels.

Institutional accreditation is essential to the reputation of any school. Transferring credits and even finding a job can be difficult if you graduated from an unaccredited college or university.

Specific programs may also obtain accreditation. For example, organizations like the Commission on Collegiate Nursing and the Accrediting Commission for Nursing Education accredit nursing departments in schools. Business schools may be recognized by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs.

International students should always research and confirm the accreditation status of their prospective schools and programs. By confirming that the desired institution and program meets quality standards, enrollees can have peace of mind knowing that they are making a worthwhile investment in their education.

What support does the school offer international students?

International students can start exploring available resources by contacting the schools’ international student offices. These departments can get the ball rolling by helping with visas, financial aid, and immigration matters.

Some colleges offer English language centers for students looking for additional support. International learners may need to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) to be admitted. Some institutions offer online TOEFL courses to help international candidates prepare for the exam.

International students are not eligible for federal funding through the FAFSA, but colleges and universities can still use this form to determine if an international enrollee is eligible for state or school aid. Institutions may also offer scholarships specifically for international students. For this reason, international students must always complete the FAFSA.

Schools may also provide guidance or counseling specifically for international students.

Benefits of Online College for International Students

Online colleges in the USA offer several advantages for international learners. Read on to learn more about the positives of studying in the United States as an international student.

Variety of programs

By opening up their college search to schools with online learning options, international students can continue their studies at many other institutions. In addition to an expanded list of available learning options, these enrollees can engage with peers, instructors, and courses in cultures different from their own.

Affordable options

Online programs often charge lower tuition than their on-campus counterparts. Some schools and states allow international students to pay in-state residence fees, which helps enrollees save money. Although international learners cannot complete programs entirely online from their home country, they can still save on travel and accommodation costs during the online portions of their education.

Fewer trips

Traditional in-person schooling may require long commutes for on-campus travel or relocation. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, international students were only allowed to take one online course per term, which required more travel between countries and to campus. But in the spring of 2020, the US Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) updated its policy to allow international learners to take hybrid programs.

Online students can complete a significant portion of their education from home. Some American schools partner with international institutions, allowing enrollees to take online courses with local schools before completing their programs in America.

Frequently Asked Questions About Online College For International Students

Can international students study online from their home country?

Yes, but only for part of their schooling. International students cannot take 100% online programs based in America, but they can participate in a hybrid education, which mixes online and in-person instruction.

Do I need a visa if I study online?

Generally, yes, but there are some exceptions. An international learner with hybrid enrollment at an SEVP-approved school requires an F-1 or M-1 visa. Some schools allow international learners to start school from their home country before qualifying for F-1 visa status.

Can you get a student visa for an online course in the United States?

Yes, but international students cannot take 100% online programs in the United States. Some schools help international learners obtain their F-1 and M-1 visas to take online courses with US-based schools.


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What to Know About Online College as an International Student – Forbes Advisor https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/what-to-know-about-online-college-as-an-international-student-forbes-advisor-2/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://onlinecollegeoffers.net/what-to-know-about-online-college-as-an-international-student-forbes-advisor-2/ Editorial Note: We earn a commission on partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect the opinions or ratings of our editors. International students can enroll in US programs online to expand their education options, save money, and add flexibility to their learning. However, learners from other countries who wish to study in the […]]]>

Editorial Note: We earn a commission on partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect the opinions or ratings of our editors.

International students can enroll in US programs online to expand their education options, save money, and add flexibility to their learning. However, learners from other countries who wish to study in the United States must meet strict requirements, especially amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Online education for international students can provide significant benefits to international students. This guide explores online programs for international students, including information on visas, credit requirements, online program benefits, and tuition fees.

What to Consider When Finding an Online College

International students considering an online university have many options, so the process can seem overwhelming. When researching potential schools, be sure to ask yourself the following questions.

Do they offer online programs for international students?

If you find an American school that offers online learning, make sure they offer programs for international students. For example, international learners cannot enroll in US-based 100% online programs, but they are allowed to enroll in blended courses.

Prior to COVID-19, international students could only enroll in one online course per semester. However, as of March 2020, the US government relaxed this restriction, allowing international enrollees to participate in blended learning.

Can you do 100% online work, or is it hybrid?

International students cannot complete fully online programs at US institutions. They can, however, enroll in hybrid programs, which combine online and in-person learning. Registrants have several options for taking hybrid programs, including taking courses with local partner institutions.

How much is tuition for international students?

Tuition fees vary depending on whether the school is public or private and whether the student is pursuing undergraduate or graduate studies. US schools may allow international learners to pay in-state tuition, which generally costs less than out-of-state tuition.

On average, international undergraduate students pay annual tuition fees of $25,000 to $35,000 at private schools and $30,000 to $45,000 or more at private institutions. At the undergraduate and postgraduate levels, enrollees pay an average of $20,000 to $35,000 annually in public institutions and $35,000 to $50,000 in private schools.

Is the online program accredited?

Accreditation is a process by which schools undergo voluntary and rigorous review by third-party organizations to ensure certain quality standards. Online programs are not accredited specifically for their distance learning offerings, but their host schools may hold accreditation at the institutional and programmatic levels.

Institutional accreditation is essential to the reputation of any school. Transferring credits and even finding a job can be difficult if you graduated from an unaccredited college or university.

Specific programs may also obtain accreditation. For example, organizations like the Commission on Collegiate Nursing and the Accrediting Commission for Nursing Education accredit nursing departments in schools. Business schools may be recognized by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs.

International students should always research and confirm the accreditation status of their prospective schools and programs. By confirming that the desired institution and program meets quality standards, enrollees can have peace of mind knowing that they are making a worthwhile investment in their education.

What support does the school offer international students?

International students can start exploring available resources by contacting the schools’ international student offices. These departments can get the ball rolling by helping with visas, financial aid, and immigration matters.

Some colleges offer English language centers for students looking for additional support. International learners may need to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) to be admitted. Some institutions offer online TOEFL courses to help international candidates prepare for the exam.

International students are not eligible for federal funding through the FAFSA, but colleges and universities can still use this form to determine if an international enrollee is eligible for state or school aid. Institutions may also offer scholarships specifically for international students. For this reason, international students must always complete the FAFSA.

Schools may also provide guidance or counseling specifically for international students.

Benefits of Online College for International Students

Online colleges in the USA offer several advantages for international learners. Read on to learn more about the positives of studying in the United States as an international student.

Variety of programs

By opening up their college search to schools with online learning options, international students can continue their studies at many other institutions. In addition to an expanded list of available learning options, these enrollees can engage with peers, instructors, and courses in cultures different from their own.

Affordable options

Online programs often charge lower tuition than their on-campus counterparts. Some schools and states allow international students to pay in-state residence fees, which helps enrollees save money. Although international learners cannot complete programs entirely online from their home country, they can still save on travel and accommodation costs during the online portions of their education.

Fewer trips

Traditional in-person schooling may require extensive travel time for on-campus travel or relocation. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, international students were only allowed to take one online course per term, which required more travel between countries and to campus. But in the spring of 2020, the US Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) updated its policy to allow international learners to take hybrid programs.

Online students can complete a significant portion of their education from home. Some American schools partner with international institutions, allowing enrollees to take online courses with local schools before completing their programs in America.

Frequently Asked Questions About Online College For International Students

Can international students study online from their home country?

Yes, but only for part of their schooling. International students cannot take 100% online programs based in America, but they can participate in a hybrid education, which mixes online and in-person instruction.

Do I need a visa if I study online?

Generally, yes, but there are some exceptions. An international learner with hybrid enrollment at an SEVP-approved school requires an F-1 or M-1 visa. Some schools allow international learners to start school from their home country before qualifying for F-1 visa status.

Can you get a student visa for an online course in the United States?

Yes, but international students cannot take 100% online programs in the United States. Some schools help international learners obtain their F-1 and M-1 visas to take online courses with US-based schools.


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